Wellbeing & Health

How to Address Healthcare Issues and Risks in the Workplace?

5 Mins read

Ways to address healthcare issues and risks in the workplace definitely vary. What is known is that the managers at the top usually set the criteria for good workplace health and safety. No matter how big or small your business is, directors and board members are each personally and collectively responsible for the health and safety of the employees. For effective leadership, employee morale, and business success, their role in ensuring health and safety is crucial. High health and safety standards will benefit your company and shield it from any negative press or employee unrest. A few advantages of strict health and safety procedures are as follows:

  • greater output when safe operating rules are followed;
  • lower insurance rates;
  • fewer sick days missed;
  • higher morale and retention among employees;
  • lower training expenses for replacement workers.

What are healthcare issues and risks in the workplace?

In the workplace, a risk is the likelihood that an employee would suffer injury by exposing to a hazard. For example, a loud workplace, a coworker’s undesirable behavior, a slip hazard, or defective electrical equipment. It is your responsibility as an employer to identify and manage workplace risks to ensure a safe working environment. Finding dangers wherever work is done is the first step in preventing accidents at the workplace. Next, thoroughly evaluate the risks associated with any potential trouble spots in your company. Inadequately stored items, damaged electrical wiring or cables, dripping drainage pipes, slick spots on the floor, and staff behavior, in general, may fall under this category. Determine the severity of the issue and provide the required resources after you have identified each type of risk.

Types of risks assessments

There are two categories of risk evaluations:

  • The first category is qualitative. The likelihood of danger is predicated on knowledge about the actual application of the circumstances;
  • The second type is quantitative. The likelihood of risk is more based on an individual’s judgment and supported by general risk information.

In general, qualitative risk analyses are more precise and make for strong legal proof. However, if the team’s resources are restricted to only individual judgment and broad risk information, you can still use this information to do a risk assessment and implement control measures to raise workplace safety. Have a risk management policy and procedure in place at work, ideally in the company handbook, regardless of the strategy you choose. The procedure the business will use to manage workplace health and safety should be spelled out in this policy with clarity. Additionally, it should include instructions on how to report workplace dangers and what to do in the event of an injury.

How to recognize risks in the workplace

Whether you know there is a risk in the workplace, or an employee has alerted you to a concern, you must act swiftly to reduce the chance of injury. One of the best methods to spot a risk is to visually investigate the environment. If the risk is connected to a task at work, you might need an employee to describe or demonstrate to you what the risk is and why it needs to be managed in a safe and regulated manner. Consider the following elements to identify the best course of action when evaluating potential risks in the workplace:

  • What level of danger is it? (For instance, potential injury categories and the severity of each ailment)
  • What safety precautions are in place right now? How well do they work?
  • What steps can you take to lower the danger level?
  • How critical is it to tackle these specific risks now?
address healthcare

Steps to mitigate healthcare issues and risks in the workplace

Integrate safety and health into your culture

Workplace health and safety is a goal that belongs to everyone and isn’t just one person’s or department’s duty. Because of this, every organization should strive to create a safety “culture.”

Make it clear that everyone is accountable for their health and safety. Create an incentive structure, if necessary, to reward individuals who lead by example. As you wait, make sure every employee is aware of how to identify and eliminate certain risks. For instance, instruct them on the best methods for clearing clutter, securing cords, reaching goods at an elevated height, and other pertinent scenarios to reduce the risk of slipping and falling.

Explain your health and safety policies in detail

Make sure that each employee is aware of your workplace safety policy and how it relates to their particular position before anything else. Hold frequent training sessions to keep everyone’s memory of the material current, and make sure every new hire is quickly brought up to speed.

Additionally, think about the best way to communicate your policy to your staff. You might display important information in public spaces like lunchrooms or provide each employee with a copy of a health and safety manual. Alternatively, you can take use of mobile technology by adding your policy to a mobile emergency management app, which gives all employees access to crucial information at all times and from any location.

Provide safety and health resources to workers

If companies don’t give provide resources needed to keep safe and healthy, it may be difficult for employees to prevent risks. This is especially true in sectors like manufacturing or energy, where taking small measures like mandating personal protective equipment and supplying first aid kits can greatly decrease common dangers.

The necessary instruments for the job might be provided even in corporate settings. Make sure, for instance, that computer equipment and desk chairs are ergonomic. To deter employees from utilizing rolling chairs and other methods to reach supplies, provide step ladders. Provide fire extinguishers and other necessary tools in each location. Examine whether adding extras like area rugs, which prevent slips and falls on slippery floors or convex mirrors, which prevent accidents at blind corners, might be beneficial for your facility.

Whenever feasible, consider design as well. Practice “prevention through design,” or PtD, involves spotting and removing risks while creating new systems or procedures.

Preventing injuries by addressing health and safety issues upfront can save a lot of time and money. Even basic engineering safeguards like guardrails and skid-resistant materials can make a significant difference in averting many of the more frequent incidents. Although these actions may initially cost some money, they may ultimately end up saving your company more money.

Explain your health and safety policies in detail

Make sure that each employee is aware of your workplace safety policy and how it relates to their particular position. Hold frequent training sessions to update everyone, and make sure to bring every new hire up to speed.

Additionally, think about the best way to communicate your policy to your staff. You might display important information in public spaces like lunchrooms, or distribute copies of health and safety manuals. Alternatively, you can take use of mobile technology by adding your policy to a mobile emergency management app, which gives all employees access to crucial information at all times and from any location. Make sure that everyone has access to the information when they need it most, regardless of the method you use.

Conclusion

To conclude this article, we kindly suggest you take a look on this animation below produced by Health and Safety Executive of UK, which explains the steps that managers should take to protect employees from potential harm.

Further Reading

How Labor Unions Facilitate Employee Engagement: Advantages & Disadvantages
Hard and Soft HRM Approaches: A Comparison
360-Degree Feedback: Pros & Cons

88 posts

About author
Fatjona Gërguri is the content writer for Employee Experience Magazine, covering the relevant topics about employee experience, organizational culture and general HR topics.
Articles
Related posts
Wellbeing & Health

Here’s How to Maintain Work-Life Balance as a Busy HR Manager

4 Mins read
Being an HR manager doesn’t mean that you have to worry about management all the time and compromise on your life. You have to become a “role model” of work-life balance if you want to boost the productivity of your employees and live to the fullest. 
Wellbeing & Health

Neutralizing negativity in the workplace

3 Mins read
Neutralizing negativity in the workplace is important because it is one of the most common obstacles to a healthy work environment.
Wellbeing & Health

4 ways to make mental wellbeing support accessible at work

6 Mins read
Poor mental wellbeing is costing business £56 billion per year, while mental wellness issues cause over half of all sick days.
Get a selection of the best & newest articles straight to your inbox.

Subscribe

Subscribing to Employee Experience Magazine provides you with exclusive insights and updates from the world of EX. Be the first to get the updates and exclusive stories and offers.